ukiiukii:

some classy fellows

ukiiukii:

some classy fellows

you-wish-you-had-this-url:

221cbakerstreet:

charlotteiq:

jade-cooper:

sarah-belham:

"The Favorite" by Omar Rayyan

Favorite what? Demon?!

Loving the fact that whatever it is is wearing a matching flower.

18th century Lilo and Stitch

so i looked up some of this guys other stuff and I

uh

what the fuck

sexy parrot girls yeah ok

oh look the demon has little babies

you-wish-you-had-this-url:

221cbakerstreet:

charlotteiq:

jade-cooper:

sarah-belham:

"The Favorite" by Omar Rayyan

Favorite what? Demon?!

Loving the fact that whatever it is is wearing a matching flower.

18th century Lilo and Stitch

so i looked up some of this guys other stuff and I

uh

what the fuck

sexy parrot girls yeah ok

oh look the demon has little babies

alvaradorendgil:

Credits to http://vishstudio.deviantart.com/

d-beatwarrior:

disfigurednight:

へ(゜∇ °)ノ

babe


A Fin whale carcass the bears have been feeding on for the past year lies beneath the surface of the water, Svalbard, Norway.

A Fin whale carcass the bears have been feeding on for the past year lies beneath the surface of the water, Svalbard, Norway.

red-lipstick:

Sebastian Bieniek (b. 1975, Czarnowasy, Poland, German) - From DoubleFaced series, 2013      Photography

Andy Goldsworthy’s art

suklad:

Bodies (2006)

Nadav Kander

seiketsuu:

Shohei Yamashita.

seiketsuu:

Shohei Yamashita.

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

sage137:

artwork by japanese tattoo artist kazuaki horitomo kitamura

sage137:

artwork by japanese tattoo artist kazuaki horitomo kitamura

1000scientists:

Robert PorazinskiField, 2013Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in

1000scientists:

Robert Porazinski
Field, 2013
Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in

dancingwithbelugawhales:

Lucy-green, Kohei-iwamoto, Madeline Graham and Sir Jon Trimmer in The RNZB production of Coppélia.